Sunday, August 17, 2008

A FEW THOUGHTS ABOUT SOME OF YOUR QUESTIONS BEFORE THE HAMPTON CLASSIC

Hi, everyone, thank you for your continued support and questions about riding and horses.

Today, I wanted to write to you about why I may not answer some of the questions that you have asked of me. I do appreciate the time you spend thinking of questions and for all of the personal experiences you have shared with me during the past two plus years. I want to share a word of caution with you about why I may not answer some of your questions such as what do you do when you flat a horse. Although I am gaining experience everyday as a professional, I am a far cry from an equestrian expert. Horses and riders are individuals with unique characteristics which require a wealth of consideration especially when they are being trained. So, when you flat your horse, for example, the degree and persistence of each exercise executed for a particular horse and/or rider's benefit will vary over time, with differences in intensity and duration. For example, one of the reasons you are asked to specify what height you will jump a horse when attending a clinic taught by an expert, is to insure that the lesson/clinic/instruction are commensurate with the ability of the horse and rider. When you are training your horse and you have gotten to know all of his or her quirks, strengths and weaknesses, you soon recognize that what is required of a young horse changes as they age, or as their work and competition level changes. In general, teaching strategies will change according to the ability and experience level of an individual and without that information, it is difficult to answer a question not knowing the details and the first hand knowledge of the horse and rider involved.

The same problem in one horse can require a completely different solution in another horse. The point, here, is that in order to develop an accurate program, using the guidance of an experienced professional will help to insure that complex variables which require assessment will be addressed.

So what about those of you who can not, for whatever the reason may be, get lessons or guidance from qualified professionals? Please try to read all of the books and magazine articles you can written by the masters, such as Bert de Nemethy and George Morris, to name a few and/or rent training videos at your local tack shop. Try to keep in mind that your horse has individual needs and characteristics and get advice from people in the know as much as possible!

Catch up with me next week for a report on the Hamptom Classic.
Talk to you later!
Maria Schaub

6 Comments:

At Fri Aug 29, 07:16:00 PM, Anonymous Mia said...

Thanks for the awsome blogs Maria!
Keep up the good work, your sucha good rider.
Your are such a good influence on all younger riders, including me!

Thanks
Mia

 
At Wed Sep 03, 12:53:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for keeping up with the blog! I love hearing about everything that you're doing, and it means a lot that you do this for your fans. =) Good luck at the Hampton Classic!

 
At Mon Sep 08, 07:55:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Great answer Maria! You are just as qualified to answer such questions as many people who WILL actually attempt to answer them (probably incorrectly). I appreciate your candid and honest answer! It shows that you are not "stuck on yourself" like so many young riders I meet.

 
At Sun Sep 28, 04:50:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank for the awesome blog, i have a question? i don;t have my own horse, but want to do bigger show with my barn, it seem like the mounts i ride always are getting sold. Any tips?

 
At Mon Sep 29, 03:13:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hello Maria. Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to write on here. It is appreciated!
I was wondering what your feelings were on 'horsey colleges'. You, obviously are going to a normal college, to get a general degree? But if I understand correctly will continue as a professional after college? What do you think about getting a degree in something Equestrian? How is that viewed in the industry that you've experienced? Thanks so much!
Take care.

 
At Tue Sep 30, 04:48:00 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I agree, I would LOVE to hear about your opinion on horse-oriented colleges and how you feel they are viewed in the equine world. Your opinion would be very valuable!

 

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